Search
× Search

Wondering “weather” to apply: How meteorology fits into the Knauss Fellowship

Hallee Meltzer 0 334 Article rating: No rating

By: Renee Richardson. The Sea Grant Knauss Fellowship specifically targets students who “... have an interest in ocean, coastal and Great Lakes resources and in the national policy decisions affecting those resources.” Although it is not explicitly stated, meteorology does fall under this statement. The atmosphere and the ocean are linked and, in many cases, cannot be considered independent of one another. But what does this mean exactly? 

From Paralichthys to Policy

Amara Davis 0 439 Article rating: No rating

By: Kenneth Erickson. What makes a fisheries biologist qualified to communicate with Congress about satellites and space policy? The same skills that make a successful graduate student: good time management, effective communication and the ability to process and distill complex information.

Life at sea as a Knauss Fellow

Hallee Meltzer 0 637 Article rating: No rating

By: Lu Wang. To take full advantage of all this year has to offer, I adapted a mindset early on in the fellowship to try to say “yes” to every opportunity. And so when my host office asked me if I wanted to go to sea as part of my fellowship, my response could only be, “Absolutely, I do.” 
 

A decade of growth: How Knauss fellows shaped the NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

A celebration of the program’s 10th anniversary featuring reflections by current staff who kickstarted their careers as Knauss fellows

Hallee Meltzer 0 633 Article rating: No rating

By: Halle Berger. Over the past decade, the NOAA Ocean Acidification Program (OAP) has grown through the recruitment of Sea Grant Knauss fellows like myself. In celebration of OAP’s 10th anniversary, I interviewed the former Knauss fellows currently working in OAP to better understand how the program has evolved since its inception.
 

Two sides of the same coin – fisheries science and management

Hallee Meltzer 0 1344 Article rating: No rating

By: Bryan Keller. There are plenty of fish in the sea and some of them taste really good. That is how the saying goes, right? Fisheries management is the reason why plenty of fish continue to be in the sea. But, without fisheries science, fisheries management would not be successful. Transitioning from the world of academia to the world of policy, I saw the important connection between these two fields first-hand.

RSS

Science Serving America's Coasts

National Sea Grant College Program
1315 East-West Highway | Silver Spring, MD 20910 | 301.734.1066
Contact Us

 

DOCSeal-white
DOCSeal-white