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Knauss Fellowship Blog

Waves and Sea Ice and Hurricanes, OH MY!
Waves and Sea Ice and Hurricanes, OH MY!

Waves and Sea Ice and Hurricanes, OH MY!

Waves and Sea Ice and Hurricanes, OH MY!

My Fellowship Position

Waves and Sea Ice and Hurricanes, OH MY!

By: Alison Agather. In 1912, over 1,500 people lost their lives when the RMS Titanic collided with an iceberg and sank. But what does the Titanic have to do with my fellowship role in the National Weather Service’s Ocean Prediction Center?
Learning to Swim with the Big
Learning to Swim with the Big

Learning to Swim with the Big "Fish" (Marine Mammals)

Learning to Swim with the Big "Fish" (Marine Mammals)

My Fellowship Position

Learning to Swim with the Big "Fish" (Marine Mammals)

By Roxanne J Carini
In graduate school, I would quip that I studied everything about the ocean, except what lived there! So, imagine my surprise when I wound up at the Marine Mammal Commission for my year-long Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship.  Falling in love with the world of marine mammals didn’t take long! But, not for the...
From Math to Mapping: Characterizing the U.S. Caribbean
From Math to Mapping: Characterizing the U.S. Caribbean

From Math to Mapping: Characterizing the U.S. Caribbean

From Math to Mapping: Characterizing the U.S. Caribbean

My Fellowship Position

From Math to Mapping: Characterizing the U.S. Caribbean

By Katharine Egan A few weeks ago, I was sitting in the wet lab on the NOAA Ship Nancy Foster watching a video feed from the remotely operated vehicle (ROV) that I helped to deploy. The pilot guided the ROV into shallower waters, and I was quick to identify the corals as these depths. I thought about what I was doing this time last year: sitting...
Conservation Success: How Regulations, Policy and Habitat Restoration benefit Wildlife and People.
Conservation Success: How Regulations, Policy and Habitat Restoration benefit Wildlife and People.

Conservation Success: How Regulations, Policy and Habitat...

Conservation Success: How Regulations, Policy and Habitat Restoration benefit Wildlife and People.

My Fellowship Position

Conservation Success: How Regulations, Policy and Habitat Restoration benefit Wildlife and People.

By: Alicia Wilson While spending my first field season of graduate school on the coastal barrier islands of Georgia, I thought I was lucky to witness a record number of loggerhead sea turtle nests for the state. Three years later, as I watch from my fellowship in D.C., I am even more amazed. Loggerhead sea turtle ladies are kicking butt in...
Spreading the Wing: Congressional Outreach for Monarch Butterfly
Spreading the Wing: Congressional Outreach for Monarch Butterfly

Spreading the Wing: Congressional Outreach for Monarch...

Spreading the Wing: Congressional Outreach for Monarch Butterfly

My Fellowship Position

Spreading the Wing: Congressional Outreach for Monarch Butterfly

By Liz Berg As a Congressional and Legislative Affairs Fellow with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), I act as a liaison between the FWS and Congress. One of the issue areas I work on is the conservation of pollinators, including the monarch butterfly. I have responded to inquiries from staff who work for Senators, House...
From “No” to “Ph.D”: a journey from “imposter” to scientist
From “No” to “Ph.D”: a journey from “imposter” to scientist

From “No” to “Ph.D”: a journey from “imposter” to scientist

From “No” to “Ph.D”: a journey from “imposter” to scientist

Communication

From “No” to “Ph.D”: a journey from “imposter” to scientist

By Zac Cannizzo “Not for you. You just don’t have the mind for science.” The words of my 8th grade science teacher when I asked to be placed in Biology for my freshman year. It hurt. I always liked science, and I loved biology. Some of my earliest memories are watching Jack Hanna’s Animal Adventures. From a young age, I...
Look for the Helpers: Conservation-Focused Research amidst Environmental Crises
Look for the Helpers: Conservation-Focused Research amidst Environmental Crises

Look for the Helpers: Conservation-Focused Research amidst...

Look for the Helpers: Conservation-Focused Research amidst Environmental Crises

My Fellowship Position

Look for the Helpers: Conservation-Focused Research amidst Environmental Crises

By: Andie Chan. I pressed my SCUBA mask to my face as I back rolled off a small catamaran into the warm tropical waters of the Florida Keys. It was my first time SCUBA diving for my Ph.D. research, and I was eager to prove myself. I was starting a project on increasing our understanding of the reproduction and population sizes of pillar corals...
A Lasting Humatak Watershed Adventure
A Lasting Humatak Watershed Adventure

A Lasting Humatak Watershed Adventure

A Lasting Humatak Watershed Adventure

Outreach

A Lasting Humatak Watershed Adventure

“Look! This is where we live?! I can’t believe we’re still on Guam! It’s so beautiful!” That was the genuine reaction of a middle schooler as our bus climbed a hill, revealing to us a breathtaking view of Sella Bay in southern Guam. We were en route to our first stop on the Humatak Watershed Adventure, which I was...

Tuesday, July 23, 2019

From “No” to “Ph.D”: a journey from “imposter” to scientist

By Zac Cannizzo

“Not for you. You just don’t have the mind for science.” The words of my 8th grade science teacher when I asked to be placed in Biology for my freshman year. It hurt. I always liked science, and I loved biology. Some of my earliest memories are watching Jack Hanna’s Animal Adventures. From a young age, I wanted to be a biologist. But, I guess it wasn’t for me. I guess I’m not smart enough. I guess maybe I need to do something else. I just don’t have the mind for science.

Two years. I believed her for two years.

 

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Monday, July 15, 2019

Look for the Helpers: Conservation-Focused Research amidst Environmental Crises

By: Andie Chan. I pressed my SCUBA mask to my face as I back rolled off a small catamaran into the warm tropical waters of the Florida Keys. It was my first time SCUBA diving for my Ph.D. research, and I was eager to prove myself. I was starting a project on increasing our understanding of the reproduction and population sizes of pillar corals using genetic techniques, so I needed to collect small pieces of tissue from multiple colonies to bring back to the lab at Penn State. Fortunately, pillar corals at this dive site in Key Largo were conspicuous and prevalent. I swam along a 60 meter stretch of upward-reaching colonies that looked almost furry with their tentacles moving in the current. With great care, I took a small amount of tissue from several colonies to minimize wounding these animals – many of which were likely hundreds of years old.

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Thursday, May 16, 2019

A Lasting Humatak Watershed Adventure

“Look! This is where we live?! I can’t believe we’re still on Guam! It’s so beautiful!” That was the genuine reaction of a middle schooler as our bus climbed a hill, revealing to us a breathtaking view of Sella Bay in southern Guam. We were en route to our first stop on the Humatak Watershed Adventure, which I was co-leading as a part of my extension project for my University of Guam Sea Grant Fellowship.

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